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NelsonG

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NelsonG last won the day on April 3 2019

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  1. It could be the long-awaited turning point in the world of venture capital and beyond. Yale, whose $32 billion endowment has been led since 1985 by the legendary investor David Swensen, just let its 70 U.S. money managers across a variety of asset classes know that for the school, diversity has now moved front and center. According to the WSJ, Swensen has told the firms that from here on out, they be measured annually on their progress in increasing the diversity of their investment staff, meaning their hiring, training, mentoring and retention of women and minorities. Those that show little improvement may see the university pull its money, Swensen tells the outlet. It’s hard to overstate the move’s significance. Though Yale’s endowment saw atypically poor performance last year, Swensen, at 66, is among the most highly regarded money managers in the world, growing Yale’s endowment from $1 billion when he joined as a 31-year-old former grad student of the school, to the second-largest school endowment in the country today after Harvard, which currently manages $40 billion. Credited for developing the so-called Yale Model, which is short on public equities and long on commitments to venture shops, private equity funds, hedge funds, and international investments, Swensen has inspired legions of other endowment managers, many of whom worked with him previously, including the current endowment heads at Princeton, Stanford, and the University of Pennsylvania. It isn’t a stretch to imagine that they will again follow Swensen’s lead, which could go a long way in changing the stubbornly intractable world of money management, which remains mostly white and mostly male across asset classes. While the dearth of woman and minorities within the ranks of venture firms may not be news to readers, a 2019 study commissioned by the Knight Foundation and cited by the WSJ found that women- and minority-owned firms held less than 1% of assets managed by mutual funds, hedge funds, private-equity funds and real-estate funds in 2017, even though their performance was on a par with such firms. Swensen tells that WSJ that he has long talked about diversity with the fund managers to which the endowment commits capital, but that he had he held of anything systematic owing to a belief, in part, that there were not enough diverse candidate entering into asset management for a mandate to make sense. After the Black Lives Movement gained momentum this spring, he decided it was time to take the leap. What about that perceived pipeline concern? Fund managers will have to figure it out if they. For his part, says the WSJ, Swensen offered a suggestion to those same U.S. managers. He proposed that they forget standard resumes and consider recruiting directly from college campuses. View the full article
  2. SAVE 82%: A three-year subscription to CyberGhost VPN is on sale for £1.99 per month as of Oct. 24, and includes an extra three months for free. There are a lot of VPN providers out there, so which one should you pick? If security is your priority, NordVPN might be your best option. If you are all about unlocking streaming services, ExpressVPN is probably the best service for you. If you're looking for a bit of everything, we recommend CyberGhost VPN. CyberGhost VPN offers a wide range of advanced security services, but still shines when it comes to unlocking streaming sites like Netflix, Prime Video, and Disney+. It's a really strong all-round option for beginners and experienced users. Read more... More about Vpn, Mashable Shopping, Shopping Uk, Uk Deals, and CyberghostView the full article
  3. SAVE OVER £50: A one-year subscription to NordVPN is on sale for £3.79 per month as of Oct. 24, saving you 58% on list price. Pretty much all of the best VPN providers offer their cheapest monthly rates for their longest plans. These VPNs are rewarding you for your commitment, which makes sense. Not everyone wants to commit to multiple years of the same service though, especially if the world of VPNs is still something that's unfamiliar. That's why it's often best to opt for a shorter contract until you find something that works. SEE ALSO: Work from home securely with this powerful VPN NordVPN offers its best rate for its two-year plan, but you can still save 58% with a one-year deal. A one-year subscription to NordVPN is on sale for £3.79 per month as of Oct. 24, saving you 58% on list price. This also comes with a generous 30-day money-back guarantee, so you can always change your mind if things don't work out. Read more... More about Vpn, Mashable Shopping, Shopping Uk, Uk Deals, and NordvpnView the full article
  4. TL;DR: The Ultimate PMP, Six Sigma and Minitab Certification Bundle is on sale for £38.31 as of Oct. 24, saving you 97% on list price. If a six-figure salary is what you're after, you'll be happy to know that earning that kind of money isn't that far out of reach. In fact, you could be earning an impressive wage from the comfort of your sofa and never even have to put on trousers. Project managers have been working remotely for a few years already, and that's only going to be on the rise now in a post-pandemic world. The best way to jump into this lucrative career is to get certified — but it's easier said than done. Read more... More about Project Management, Mashable Shopping, Online Courses, Shopping Uk, and Uk Deals View the full article
  5. Shortly after voting to move forward with a pair of subpoenas, the Senate Judiciary Committee has reached an agreement that will see the CEOs of two major social platforms testify voluntarily in November. The hearing will be the second major congressional appearance by tech CEOs arranged this month. Twitter’s Jack Dorsey and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg will answer questions at the hearing, set for November 17 — two weeks after election day. The Republican-led committee is chaired by South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, who set the agenda to include the “platforms’ censorship and suppression of New York Post articles.” According to a new press release from the committee, lawmakers also plan to use the proceedings as a high-profile port-mortem on how Twitter and Facebook fared on and after election day — an issue that lawmakers on both sides will undoubtedly be happy to dig into. Republicans are eager to press the tech CEOs on how their respective platforms handled a dubious story from the New York Post purporting to report on hacked materials from presidential candidate Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden. They view the incident as evidence of their ongoing claims of anti-conservative political bias in platform policy decisions. While Republicans on the Senate committee led the decision to pressure Zuckerberg and Dorsey into testifying, the committee’s Democrats, who sat out the vote on the subpoenas, will likely bring to the table their own questions about content moderation, as well. View the full article
  6. PayPal, Hunter Biden, Bloomberg News, and several Avengers were targeted in a series of unhinged open letters from Epik after PayPal terminated its account. The domain registrar, whose CEO once defended David Duke on a white nationalist podcast, is home to Gab and other far-right websites, and formerly hosted 8chan. It also hosts the domain of the former website of the violent far-right Proud Boys, which was recently spoofed in emails threatening Democratic voters. Epik claimed it was cut off due to "anti-conservative bias." PayPal said it had nothing to do with political ideology, but was instead due to financial risk issues. Read more... More about Paypal, Domain Names, Proud Boys, Deplatforming, and EpikView the full article
  7. After a wild week with dueling presidential town hall events and a Supreme Court nominee push only weeks before the election, our Google searches were pretty wide-ranging and involved some scandals and gossip. For the week of Oct. 15 to Oct. 23 here were some of the top questions for Google's search engine. 1. Who is Jeffrey Toobin? When Zoom and an "accidental" exposure/masturbation incident collide, people want to know the details. Political commenter and contributor to CNN and The New Yorker Jeffrey Toobin was on a work call with the New Yorker and WNYC radio when, he later said, he thought he was off camera, so he got to some pressing, uh, personal business. He wasn't. Now the magazine has suspended him and CNN has given him some time off. Read more... More about Google, 2020 Election, Tech, Big Tech Companies, and PoliticsView the full article
  8. In the immortal words of Mean Girls, "Halloween is the one day a year when a girl can dress up like a total slut and no other girls can say anything else about it." As kids, we loved Halloween for being the one glorious occasion our parents let us gorge on all the tricks and treats we wanted. As adults, Halloween lets us indulge in different kinds of carnal pleasures, as a night of unfettered naughtiness that's quite nice. For once, we're allowed to embody our wildest personas and fantasies without shame or fear of other people's judgment. "Halloween is an annual excuse to don a costume and temporarily become someone — or something — else," said Dr. Justin Lehmiller, a researcher at the Kinsey Institute with a doctorate in social psychology. "Psychologically, we know that putting on a costume can change behavior. For example, when people wear a mask... There’s this escape from self-awareness that emerges, that can have the effect of lowering inhibitions and opening the door to doing things you wouldn’t normally do." Read more... More about Halloween, Bdsm, Culture, and Sex Relationships View the full article
  9. In ye olden days of piracy, RIAA takedown notices were a common thing — I received a few myself. But that’s mostly fallen off as tracking pirates has gotten more difficult. But the RIAA can still issue nastygrams — to the creators of software that could potentially be used to violate copyright, like YouTube downloaders. One such popular tool used by many developers, YouTube-DL, has been removed from GitHub for the present after an RIAA threat, as noted by Freedom of the Press Foundation’s Parker Higgins earlier today. This is a different kind of takedown notice than the ones we all remember from the early 2000s, though. Those were the innumerable DMCA notices that said “your website is hosting such-and-such protected content, please take it down.” And they still exist, of course, but lots of that has become automated, with sites like YouTube removing infringing videos before they even go public. What the RIAA has done here is demand that YouTube -DL be taken down because it violates Section 1201 of U.S. copyright law, which basically bans stuff that gets around DRM. “No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.” That’s so it’s illegal not just to distribute, say, a bootleg Blu-ray disc, but also to break its protections and duplicate it in the first place. If you stretch that logic a bit, you end up including things like YouTube-DL, which is a command-line tool that takes in a YouTube URL and points the user to the raw video and audio, which of course have to be stored on a server somewhere. With the location of the file that would normally be streamed in the YouTube web player, the user can download a video for offline use or backup. But what if someone were to use that tool to download the official music video for Taylor Swift’s “Shake it off”? Shock! Horror! Piracy! YouTube-DL enables this, so it must be taken down, they write. As usual, it only takes a moment to arrive at analogous (or analog) situations that the RIAA has long given up on. For instance, wouldn’t using a screen and audio capture utility accomplish the same thing? What about a camcorder? Or for that matter, a cassette recorder? They’re all used to “circumvent” the DRM placed on Tay’s video by creating an offline copy without the rights-holder’s permission. Naturally this takedown will do almost nothing to prevent the software, which was probably downloaded and forked thousands of times already, from being used or updated. There are also dozens of sites and apps that do this — and the RIAA by the logic in this letter may very well take action against them as well. Of course, the RIAA is bound by duty to protect against infringement, and one can’t expect it to stand by idly as people scrape official YouTube accounts to get high-quality bootlegs of artists’ entire discographies. But going after the basic tools is like the old, ineffective “Home taping is killing the music industry” line. No one’s buying it. And if we’re going to talk about wholesale theft of artists, perhaps the RIAA should get its own house in order first — streaming services are paying out pennies with the Association’s blessing. (Go buy stuff on Bandcamp instead.) Tools like YouTube-DL, like cassette tapes, cameras and hammers, are tech that can be used legally or illegally. Fair use doctrines allow tools like these for good-faith efforts like archiving content that might be lost because Google stops caring, or for people who for one reason or another want to have a local copy of some widely available, free piece of media for personal use. YouTube and other platforms, likewise in good faith, do what they can to make obvious and large-scale infringement difficult. There’s no “download” button next to the latest Top 40 hit, but there are links to buy it, and if I used a copy — even one I’d bought — as background for my own video, I wouldn’t even be able to put it on YouTube in the first place. Temporarily removing YouTube-DL’s code from GitHub is a short-sighted reaction to a problem that can’t possibly amount to more than a rounding error in the scheme of things. They probably lose more money to people sharing logins. It or something very much like it will be back soon, a little smarter and a little better, making the RIAA’s job that much harder, and the cycle will repeat. Maybe the creators of Whack-a-Mole will sue the RIAA for infringement on their unique IP. View the full article
  10. A California court weighs in as Prop. 22 looms, Google removes popular apps over data collection practices and the Senate subpoenas Jack Dorsey and Mark Zuckerberg. This is your Daily Crunch for October 23, 2020. The big story: Uber and Lyft defeated again in court A California appeals court ruled that yes, a new state law applies to Uber and Lyft drivers, meaning that they must be classified as employees, rather than independent contractors. The judge ruled that contrary to the rideshare companies’ arguments, any financial harm does not “rise to the level of irreparable harm.” However, the decision will not take effect for 30 days — suggesting that the real determining factor will be Proposition 22, a statewide ballot measure backed by Uber and Lyft that would keep drivers as contractors while guaranteeing things like minimum compensation and healthcare subsidies. “This ruling makes it more urgent than ever for voters to stand with drivers and vote yes on Prop. 22,” a Lyft spokesperson told TechCrunch. The tech giants Google removes 3 Android apps for children, with 20M+ downloads between them, over data collection violations — Researchers at the International Digital Accountability Council found that a trio of popular and seemingly innocent-looking apps aimed at younger users were violating Google’s data collection policies. Huawei reports slowing growth as its operations ‘face significant challenges’ — The full impact of U.S. trade restrictions hasn’t been realized yet, because the government has granted Huawei several waivers. Senate subpoenas could force Zuckerberg and Dorsey to testify on New York Post controversy — The Senate Judiciary Committee voted in favor of issuing subpoenas for Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey. Startups, funding and venture capital Quibi says it will shut down in early December — A newly published support page on the Quibi site says streaming will end “on or about December 1, 2020.” mmhmm, Phil Libin’s new startup, acquires Memix to add enhanced filters to its video presentation toolkit — Memix has built a series of filters you can apply to videos to change the lighting, the details in the background or across the whole screen. Nordic challenger bank Lunar raises €40M Series C, plans to enter the ‘buy now, pay later’ space — Lunar started out as a personal finance manager app but acquired a full banking license in 2019. Advice and analysis from Extra Crunch Here’s how fast a few dozen startups grew in Q3 2020 — This is as close to private company earnings reports as we can manage. The short, strange life of Quibi — Everything you need to know about the Quibi story, all in one place. (Reminder: Extra Crunch is our membership program, which aims to democratize information about startups. You can sign up here.) Everything else France rebrands contact-tracing app in an effort to boost downloads — France’s contact-tracing app has been updated and is now called TousAntiCovid, which means “everyone against Covid.” Representatives propose bill limiting presidential internet ‘kill switch’ — The bill would limit the president’s ability to shut down the internet at will. The Daily Crunch is TechCrunch’s roundup of our biggest and most important stories. If you’d like to get this delivered to your inbox every day at around 3pm Pacific, you can subscribe here. View the full article
  11. Research papers come out far too rapidly for anyone to read them all, especially in the field of machine learning, which now affects (and produces papers in) practically every industry and company. This column aims to collect the most relevant recent discoveries and papers — particularly in but not limited to artificial intelligence — and explain why they matter. This week, a startup that’s using UAV drones for mapping forests, a look at how machine learning can map social media networks and predict Alzheimer’s, improving computer vision for space-based sensors and other news regarding recent technological advances. Predicting Alzheimer’s through speech patterns Machine learning tools are being used to aid diagnosis in many ways, since they’re sensitive to patterns that humans find difficult to detect. IBM researchers have potentially found such patterns in speech that are predictive of the speaker developing Alzheimer’s disease. The system only needs a couple minutes of ordinary speech in a clinical setting. The team used a large set of data (the Framingham Heart Study) going back to 1948, allowing patterns of speech to be identified in people who would later develop Alzheimer’s. The accuracy rate is about 71% or 0.74 area under the curve for those of you more statistically informed. That’s far from a sure thing, but current basic tests are barely better than a coin flip in predicting the disease this far ahead of time. This is very important because the earlier Alzheimer’s can be detected, the better it can be managed. There’s no cure, but there are promising treatments and practices that can delay or mitigate the worst symptoms. A non-invasive, quick test of well people like this one could be a powerful new screening tool and is also, of course, an excellent demonstration of the usefulness of this field of tech. (Don’t read the paper expecting to find exact symptoms or anything like that — the array of speech features aren’t really the kind of thing you can look out for in everyday life.) So-cell networks Making sure your deep learning network generalizes to data outside its training environment is a key part of any serious ML research. But few attempt to set a model loose on data that’s completely foreign to it. Perhaps they should! Researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden took a model used to identify groups and connections in social media, and applied it (not unmodified, of course) to tissue scans. The tissue had been treated so that the resultant images produced thousands of tiny dots representing mRNA. Normally the different groups of cells, representing types and areas of tissue, would need to be manually identified and labeled. But the graph neural network, created to identify social groups based on similarities like common interests in a virtual space, proved it could perform a similar task on cells. (See the image at top.) “We’re using the latest AI methods — specifically, graph neural networks, developed to analyze social networks — and adapting them to understand biological patterns and successive variation in tissue samples. The cells are comparable to social groupings that can be defined according to the activities they share in their social networks,” said Uppsala’s Carolina Wählby. It’s an interesting illustration not just of the flexibility of neural networks, but of how structures and architectures repeat at all scales and in all contexts. As without, so within, if you will. Drones in nature The vast forests of our national parks and timber farms have countless trees, but you can’t put “countless” on the paperwork. Someone has to make an actual estimate of how well various regions are growing, the density and types of trees, the range of disease or wildfire, and so on. This process is only partly automated, as aerial photography and scans only reveal so much, while on-the-ground observation is detailed but extremely slow and limited. Treeswift aims to take a middle path by equipping drones with the sensors they need to both navigate and accurately measure the forest. By flying through much faster than a walking person, they can count trees, watch for problems and generally collect a ton of useful data. The company is still very early-stage, having spun out of the University of Pennsylvania and acquired an SBIR grant from the NSF. “Companies are looking more and more to forest resources to combat climate change but you don’t have a supply of people who are growing to meet that need,” Steven Chen, co-founder and CEO of Treeswift and a doctoral student in Computer and Information Science (CIS) at Penn Engineering said in a Penn news story. “I want to help make each forester do what they do with greater efficiency. These robots will not replace human jobs. Instead, they’re providing new tools to the people who have the insight and the passion to manage our forests.” Another area where drones are making lots of interesting moves is underwater. Oceangoing autonomous submersibles are helping map the sea floor, track ice shelves and follow whales. But they all have a bit of an Achilles’ heel in that they need to periodically be picked up, charged and their data retrieved. Purdue engineering professor Nina Mahmoudian has created a docking system by which submersibles can easily and automatically connect for power and data exchange. A yellow marine robot (left, underwater) finds its way to a mobile docking station to recharge and upload data before continuing a task. (Purdue University photo/Jared Pike) The craft needs a special nosecone, which can find and plug into a station that establishes a safe connection. The station can be an autonomous watercraft itself, or a permanent feature somewhere — what matters is that the smaller craft can make a pit stop to recharge and debrief before moving on. If it’s lost (a real danger at sea), its data won’t be lost with it. You can see the setup in action below: https://youtu.be/kS0-qc_r0 Sound in theory Drones may soon become fixtures of city life as well, though we’re probably some ways from the automated private helicopters some seem to think are just around the corner. But living under a drone highway means constant noise — so people are always looking for ways to reduce turbulence and resultant sound from wings and propellers. It looks like it’s on fire, but that’s turbulence. Researchers at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology found a new, more efficient way to simulate the airflow in these situations; fluid dynamics is essentially as complex as you make it, so the trick is to apply your computing power to the right parts of the problem. They were able to render only flow near the surface of the theoretical aircraft in high resolution, finding past a certain distance there was little point knowing exactly what was happening. Improvements to models of reality don’t always need to be better in every way — after all, the results are what matter. Machine learning in space Computer vision algorithms have come a long way, and as their efficiency improves they are beginning to be deployed at the edge rather than at data centers. In fact it’s become fairly common for camera-bearing objects like phones and IoT devices to do some local ML work on the image. But in space it’s another story. Image Credits: Cosine Performing ML work in space was until fairly recently simply too expensive power-wise to even consider. That’s power that could be used to capture another image, transmit the data to the surface, etc. HyperScout 2 is exploring the possibility of ML work in space, and its satellite has begun applying computer vision techniques immediately to the images it collects before sending them down. (“Here’s a cloud — here’s Portugal — here’s a volcano…”) For now there’s little practical benefit, but object detection can be combined with other functions easily to create new use cases, from saving power when no objects of interest are present, to passing metadata to other tools that may work better if informed. In with the old, out with the new Machine learning models are great at making educated guesses, and in disciplines where there’s a large backlog of unsorted or poorly documented data, it can be very useful to let an AI make a first pass so that graduate students can use their time more productively. The Library of Congress is doing it with old newspapers, and now Carnegie Mellon University’s libraries are getting into the spirit. CMU’s million-item photo archive is in the process of being digitized, but to make it useful to historians and curious browsers it needs to be organized and tagged — so computer vision algorithms are being put to work grouping similar images, identifying objects and locations, and doing other valuable basic cataloguing tasks. “Even a partly successful project would greatly improve the collection metadata, and could provide a possible solution for metadata generation if the archives were ever funded to digitize the entire collection,” said CMU’s Matt Lincoln. A very different project, yet one that seems somehow connected, is this work by a student at the Escola Politécnica da Universidade de Pernambuco in Brazil, who had the bright idea to try sprucing up some old maps with machine learning. The tool they used takes old line-drawing maps and attempts to create a sort of satellite image based on them using a Generative Adversarial Network; GANs essentially attempt to trick themselves into creating content they can’t tell apart from the real thing. Image Credits: Escola Politécnica da Universidade de Pernambuco Well, the results aren’t what you might call completely convincing, but it’s still promising. Such maps are rarely accurate but that doesn’t mean they’re completely abstract — recreating them in the context of modern mapping techniques is a fun idea that might help these locations seem less distant. View the full article
  12. This year has shaken up venture capital, turning a hot early start to 2020 into a glacial period permeated with fear during the early days of COVID-19. That ice quickly melted as venture capitalists discovered that demand for software and other services that startups provide was accelerating, pushing many young tech companies back into growth mode, and investors back into the check-writing arena. Boston has been an exemplar of the trend, with early pandemic caution dissolving into rapid-fire dealmaking as summer rolled into fall. We collated new data that underscores the trend, showing that Boston’s third quarter looks very solid compared to its peer groups, and leads greater New England’s share of American venture capital higher during the three-month period. For our October look at Boston and its startup scene, let’s get into the data and then understand how a new cohort of founders is cropping up among the city’s educational network. A strong Q3, a strong 2020 Boston’s third quarter was strong, effectively matching the capital raised in New York City during the three-month period. As we head into the fourth quarter, it appears that the silver medal in American startup ecosystems is up for grabs based on what happens in Q4. Boston could start 2021 as the number-two place to raise venture capital in the country. Or New York City could pip it at the finish line. Let’s check the numbers. According to PitchBook data shared with TechCrunch, the metro Boston area raised $4.34 billion in venture capital during the third quarter. New York City and its metro area managed $4.45 billion during the same time period, an effective tie. Los Angeles and its own metro area managed just $3.90 billion. In 2020 the numbers tilt in Boston’s favor, with the city and surrounding area collecting $12.83 billion in venture capital. New York City came in second through Q3, with $12.30 billion in venture capital. Los Angeles was a distant third at $8.66 billion for the year through Q3. View the full article
  13. Take a quick jaunt over to TrumpCovidPlan.com, and you'll get what, at first, seems like an error message. "Not Found," the site reads, quite similarly to a 404 error page. "The Trump plan to defeat the Coronavirus and reopen safely does not exist," the error message reads. Start clicking, though, and you'll quickly realize the site is a clever play from the Biden team. Former Vice President Joe Biden himself tweeted out the website on Friday, writing: "After eight months of this pandemic, we finally found President Trump's plan to beat COVID-19." The point is obvious: The Trump administration has no plan. Read more... More about Trump, Covid 19, Culture, and PoliticsView the full article
  14. The virtual room allows you to play with different elements and construct your own beats. Read more... More about Tech, Google, Music, Mashable Video, and Future Blink View the full article
  15. Eric Prydz has finally dropped his already beloved production “NOPUS” — marking one of his most coveted productions to date. “NOPUS” delivers on every level with its theatrical build and release. The grand, euphoric song has all the makings of a masterpiece with whirling synths and melodics, bright, twinkling arps — and, overall, the kind of upbeat energy we need in 2020. In addition, Prydz has unleashed an official music video for the track featuring his insane HOLO production. He shares, “We made this video because it reminds us of good times. I really hope you all get the same feeling we do.” Similarly to Prydz’s iconic 2015 release “Opus,” which led into his debut Opus album, the song tends to play out toward the end of his performances. The pun here is “not Opus” = “NOPUS” — and the name just stuck. Now, we can listen anytime we want. Listen to “NOPUS” in its final form right here. Eric Prydz – NOPUS Stream/download: https://lnk.to/EPNOPUSyd Photo via Rukes.com This article was first published on Your EDM. Source: Eric Prydz Drops Beloved Fan-Favorite Track “NOPUS” In Its Final Form [LISTEN] View the full article
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