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BLACK LIVES MATTER! ×
BLACK LIVES MATTER!

Your favorite Metal,Heavy Metal, NuMetal band


Yoda

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Well there is alot of them i like. Pantera, Slipknot, Korn, ba the list goes on but I would say my favorite for the longest time would have to be Coal Chamber.

What is yours?

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I liked Sepultura. Also Biohazard, Dream Theater and the old Paradise Lost, not the new ones.

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Metallica of course, and partly Tool (though they're not completely metal to a lot of people).

A lot of what I like is really hard to be nailed down completely. I can't really call them "pure" metal. For instance, some people call "Black Sabbath" metal. I call it rock/hard rock/classic rock (because to me, it's old) but I could call it somewhat metal.

This brings the obvious question, how do you define metal?

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I have to say "OLD" Metallica, I can't handle most of their newer stuff.

I alos have to say I like methods choices....well 2 of them anyways :P

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Godsmack, Sevendust................I prefer the older "Metal, Heavy Metal, Hard Rock" type stuff though............AC/DC , Boston, Motley Crue, Rush, Queen etc.

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  • 1 month later...

Yeah, Grab, I would have to agree with you there.

I dig Motorhead and I'm only fond of the AC/DC in the middle years. Post Who Made Who and the Bon Scott days are a little weak to me.

I do have fond memories of "The Jack" and "TnT."

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I just listened to Fozzy's new album "All That Remains" and it is very very good.....hell, I think i'll buy it. Chris Jericho of the WWE is alright doing this thing........at first I thought this was a joke that Vince McMahon was pushing but I think after hearing this these guys are serious.

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This is actually surprising. I wouldn't say that "Enemy" is all that bad, but music on the (2) previous album(s) was sick. I have pretty much been against Chris "Y2J" Jericho being a singer in a band from the beginning. Not much has come nicely from the world of professional wrestling. And having his arrogant ass hosting Headbanger's Ball and pimping his album every chance he got was a little stomach wrenching. In any case, I suppose I could close off my mind and not imagine him actually singing something good. Maybe I'll "acquire" it someday.

:psychofun:

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They were where metal began!!

The earliest music commonly identified as heavy metal came out of the Birmingham area of the United Kingdom in the late 1960s when bands such as Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath applied an overtly non-traditional approach to blues standards and created new music often based on blues scales and arrangements. These bands were highly influenced by American psychedelic rock musicians including Jimi Hendrix, who had pioneered amplified and processed blues-rock guitar and acted as a bridge between black American music and white European rockers.

Other oft-cited influences include Vanilla Fudge, who had slowed down and psychedelicised pop tunes, as well as earlier British rockers such as The Who and The Kinks, who had paved the way for heavy metal styles by introducing power chords and more aggressive percussion to the rock genre. Another key influence was Cream, who exemplified the power trio format that would become a staple of heavy metal. Some also cite The Beatles as a key influence; they had increasingly used distortion and heavier arrangements as early as 1967's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Perhaps the earliest song that is clearly identifiable as prototype heavy metal is "You Really Got Me" by The Kinks (1965). By late 1968 heavy blues sounds were becoming common: many fans and scholars point to Blue Cheer's 1968 cover of Eddie Cochran's hit "Summertime Blues" as the first true heavy-metal song; Beatles scholars cite in particular the song "Helter Skelter" from The White Album (1968), which set new standards for distortion and aggressive sound on a pop album. Dave Edmunds' band Love Sculpture released an aggressive heavy guitar version of Khachaturian's Sabre Dance in November 1968. The Jeff Beck Group's album Truth (late 1968) was an important and influential rock album released just before Led Zeppelin's first album, leading some (especially British blues fans) to argue that Truth was the first heavy metal album. However, it was the release of Led Zeppelin in 1969 that brought worldwide notice of the formation of a new genre.

The early heavy metal bands, like Led Zeppelin, Uriah Heep, UFO and Black Sabbath are often called hard rock bands rather than heavy metal, especially those bands whose sound was more similar to traditional rock music. In general, the terms heavy metal and hard rock are often used interchangeably, in particular when discussing the 1970s.

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fave metal guitarist....at this point in time i`d have to say dimebag darryll abbott and pantera doing " cowboys from hell " live on video at ozzfest 2000.....too much :strumma: :strumma:

" Throughout history, technical innovations have acted as catalysts for experimentation and development. Music is no exception, the first important technical advancement that allowed an adaptive musical revolution was the introduction of the electric guitar in the late 1940s. The Fender Broadcaster, later renamed the Telecaster, launched in 1950, was the world's first commercially available electric guitar, with a solid wooden body and bolt on neck. The Fender Precision Bass was launched the following year, to replace the bulky, cumbersome and frequently barely audible acoustic double bass.

The rock 'n' roll revolution exploded on the music scene during the '50s, and the development of electric guitar technique was paralleled by this phenomenon. During the late '50s, there was a growing awareness of the potential of the electric guitar. The distinction between rhythm and lead playing was clearly made and songs were now constructed to include a four or eight-bar break in the middle. A technical innovation in drumming heralded the next phase of rock music's development. In 1957, Remo Belli started supplying plastic, instead of supplying traditional calf leather skins to drum manufacturers. Plastic skins were far more functional.

In the early '60s, bands began to capitalise on the benefits offered by recent improvements in technology. In the U.K., four or five-piece outfits became the norm, comprising bass, rhythm and lead guitars plus optional keyboards or saxophone. The Rolling Stones, labelled as the "badboys" of the British invasion did much to initialise the general public's negative attitude to rock music. 1967 was an important year in the development of rock music. It saw the release of the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, which marked a growing acceptance of rock as an art form. Hendrix made a massive impact on the rock scene. His style became the blueprint for rock, and later heavy metal guitarists the world over. Led Zeppelin became the role model for other artists to follow. The basic components of their style still represent the essential aspects of heavy metal and they probably rank as the most important influence on the genre. This is an amazing feat, considering the band has been defunct for well over a decade. At the same time as Cream, Led Zeppelin and Hendrix were making waves throughout Europe, a whole new generation of bands were beginning to emerge out of garages and seedy clubs in the U.S.A.. Bands such as the MC5, the Stooges, Steppenwolf, Grand Funk Railroad and Blue Cheer all helped mould the next phase through which rock music would progress.

The impact of the MC5, Blue Cheer and the Stooges is perhaps now, in the mid '90s, more apparent than ever. Contemporary outfits such as Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden derive much inspiration from these sources. Alice Cooper's outrageous stage antics saw the inception of rock theatre, where the live show became an integral part and visual extension of the music.

1970 saw the beginning of real exponential growth in the rock industry. The boundaries between blues-rock, psychedelic rock, hard rock, heavy rock, adult-orientated-rock and progressive rock became increasingly blurred as total musical freedom became a reality. Some of the key artists that emerged at this time included High Tide, Black Cat Bones, Black Sabbath, Black Widow, Uriah Heep, UFO and Blue Oyster Cult. Kiss and Ted Nugent took glam-rock's garish image to new heights. Each of the four members of Kiss portrayed a cartoon-like character which necessitated elaborate face make-up and a science fiction-like stage attire. Aerosmith, hailing from Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. metamorphosed the basic R 'n' B and rock 'n' roll structures of bands such as the Faces and Rolling Stones into a new hard-line, infectious metallic form. 1976-1979 represent the nadir for heavy metal and hard-rock as the punk movement exploded in every major city in the U.K., and later to a lesser extent everywhere else. Punk and new wave have had a profound influence on the development of rock music ever since. Ironically, since punk's decline there has never been an ever growing realisation that the punk and metal genres are fundamentally very similar and inextricably linked.

Van Halen, who exploded onto the U.S. scene in 1978 can be regarded as perhaps the archetypal exponents of this new direction. With the dual focus of flamboyant vocalist David Lee Roth and guitarist virtuoso Eddie Van Halen, they single-handedly, rewrote the heavy metal rule-book virtually overnight. This more economic and powerful style was also clearly manifest in the approach adopted by the new bands to emerge in the U.K. between 1979 and 1981. Collectively, this is referred to as the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal (N.W.O.B.H.M.). It combines elements of both the punk movement (brevity, attitude and energy) and early '70s heavy rock (technical ability, melody and professionalism). Bands such as Iron Maiden, Saxon, Def Leppard, Demon, Venom, Raven, Angelwitch, Diamond Head, Tygers Of Pan Tang, Praying Mantis and Samson did overcome record company apathy to make a significant and long-lasting impact. 1 August 1981 was an important landmark in heavy metal, with the birth of MTV, the 24-hour television music channel. Heavy metal videos allowed the realisation and visualisation of the music's violent, exciting, sexual, mystical and rebellious imagery.

Thrash-metal was the logical progression from punk in many ways. It combined the energy, aggression and attitude of punk with the technical and musical sophistication of the N.W.O.B.H.M.. Their basic approach was utilised by Metallica, Megadeth, Anthrax and Slayer, and, of course the mighty Pantera who simply amplified, speeded up and improved technically upon the formative style. This style involved playing very fast and executing a myriad of complex instrumental time-changes. Metallica's multi-platinum, self-titled 1991 album represents concrete evidence of the mass acceptance of what was initially considered an obtuse musical style. Death metal and grindcore represent the extreme, yet logical outposts of the thrash metal sub-culture. Napalm Death, Carcass, Obituary and Death are leading exponents of this sub-genre and have a large and loyal underground following. Thrash metal also produced a new breed of lead guitarists,such as the late Darryll Abbott from Pantera. Their style is characterised by high-speed melodic lead work and represents the further development of an approach first exemplified by Alvin Lee of Ten Years After. The influences of The Stooges, MC5 and the Velvet Underground are clearly evident in the recorded works of Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Mother Love Bone and Temple Of The Dog.

Heavy metal has gradually come of age over the last quarter of a century; it has transcended, infiltrated and incorporated all musical styles to some degree, including classical, jazz, blues, rock, pop, folk and funk. To some extent, the original meaning of the word is now obsolete, although its use as a cliché by the popular media is still in a derogatory sense. The future of heavy metal offers much promise. There will be a continued acceptance of its major musical form and copies of the latest Metallica, Slayer and Def Leppard albums will no doubt be successful within the future heavy metal audience. Artistic creativity and technical innovation continue apace, and with them the potential for new and exciting musical developments. The growth and diversification of metal has proceeded at an expansive rate over the last 25 years and there is no evidence to suggest that it is slowing down. "

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Edited by kiwibank
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Foreign Objects

Edited by the70mphshit
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  • 1 year later...

I've just started listening to Skinlab I believe there kind of old but I dont know I like them alot its not like a all time great band or anything but its something cool to listen to for awhile. My favorite song is Come And Get it I just bought the CD because it was on sale for under 10 bucks haha Yeah I bought a CD you guys can take me out in the parking lot if you want.

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I just bought the CD because it was on sale for under 10 bucks haha Yeah I bought a CD you guys can take me out in the parking lot if you want.

:o

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:o

I apoligize to the fullest lol but it was used soo does that count?

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I apoligize to the fullest lol but it was used soo does that count?

Used is cool :thumbsup:

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Welcome back to all the sites, Yoda. I listen to Skinlab now and then. "Disembody the New Flesh" is pretty good.

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Yoda! Holy Shi..atsu!

Reading through this thread was like a blast from the past...like looking at an old old year book or something.

Good to see yer still above ground taking nourishment. :thumbsup:

I haven't been listening to a ton of new metal of late...The Fucking Champs are pretty cool. Yup, check out the Champs.

Noothgrush does (or did) some interesting and faithfull P.Floyd covers...Sepultura covering Sabbath's Symptom Of The Universe, or just Sepultura in general, Buckethead and Bill Laswell's Praxis stuff...Colour Haze, and Nebula (especially) totally rock though they are both more garage/stoner than metal. Still worth your trouble.

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Hey Thank guys just got bored the other day and was like oh yeah forgot about these places I work all the time now so I usually don't get to much time to go online and when I do you know me gotta talk to my ladies on the AIM :-P

But yeah Ill stop by post once in awhile just to see whats up. Man I remember back in the day these sites were like a everyday thing in the summer.

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